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Continuous Integration Authors: Pat Romanski, Liz McMillan, Elizabeth White, Amit Gupta, XebiaLabs Blog

Related Topics: Continuous Integration, Application Performance Management (APM), DevOps Journal

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Metrics and KPIs for Test Environment Stability | @DevOpsSummit #DevOps #APM #Monitoring

How often is an environment unavailable due to factors within your project’s control?

How often is an environment unavailable due to factors within your project’s control? How often is an environment unavailable due to external factors? Are the software and hardware in an environment up to date with the target Production systems? How often do you have to resort to manual workarounds due to an environment?

Metric: Availability and Uptime Percentage
QA and Staging environments seldom require the same level of uptime as Production, but tell that to a team of developers working 24/7 on a project that has an aggressive deadline. As a Test Environment Manager, you know that when a QA system is unavailable, you will get immediate calls from developers and managers.

As a Test Environment Manager, you will also want to understand the root cause of every outage. If you follow a problem management process for Production outages, you should follow a similar process with test environment management. Understanding why an outage happened is critical for communicating with a development team. Very often a QA environment will become unavailable due to a factor far outside the control of a Test Environment Manager. If one team pushes bad code that interrupts the QA process for all teams you need to be able to identify this clearly.

How to Measure Availability and Uptime?
Keep track of system availability with a standard monitoring tool such as Zabbix or Nagios. If your systems are visible to the public internet, you can also use hosted platforms like Pingdom to measure system availability.

Example Metric: Goal for Availability
An uptime of 95% is usually sufficient for a QA or Staging environment.
If your development is limited to a few time zones, you can also further qualify this by only measuring availability during development hours. While your Production availability commitment is often higher that 99% or 99.5%, you don’t have to treat every QA outage as an emergency. But, your developers may have other opinions—95% uptime still allows for eight hours of downtime a week. You may want to aim higher.

How Does This Metric Motivate Concrete Action?
When you measure system availability and make these numbers public, you encourage Test Environment Managers to make a commitment to uptime. This results in fewer obstacles for QA and development, allowing them to deliver software faster. There’s nothing more debilitating to an organization than disruptions in QA and testing. Measuring this metric allows you to encourage movement toward always-available QA systems.

Metric: Mean Time Between Outages
If your system has a 95% availability, then almost seventy-five minutes of downtime is acceptable every day. If your system fails for ten minutes every hour during an eight-hour work day due to a build or deployment, you’ll be creating a QA or Staging environment that has a 5% chance of losing developer and QA confidence. To get an accurate picture of system availability you need to couple an availability percentage metric with your mean time between outages (MTBO).

How to Measure MTBO
If you follow a process that keeps track of outages and strives to understand the root causes of these outages, you’ll develop a database of issues that you can use to derive your MTBO. If you have a monitoring system configured to calculate availability percentages automatically, you can use this same system to record your MTBO.

Example Metric: Goal for MTBO
This depends on your availability goal. The lower your availability goal, the higher your MTBO should be. For example, if you have a 95% uptime commitment then your outages need to be spaced over a day or a week. You might have eight hours of downtime each weekend to perform system upgrades or a nightly build and deploy process that takes about an hour, but what you can’t have is an MTBO of 45–60 minutes. This will mean that QA and Staging systems will be unavailable for a few minutes every hour, which will result in dissatisfied customers.

How does this Metric Motivate Concrete Action?
If your MBTO is very short, this suggests that build and deploy activity from a continuous integration environment is frequently interrupting both Development and QA. If your MBTO is very high, but your availability is very low (95% or lower) this means that you are experiencing multi-hour downtime at least once a day. When you measure MBTO, you encourage your Release Engineers and Test Environment Managers to work together to create build and deployment scripts that don’t affect availability, and you encourage your staff to approach QA and Staging uptime with care. Without this metric, you run the risk of having teams grow complacent with frequent, low-level unavailability as long as they satisfy overall availability metrics.

Metric: Downtime Requirement for a Test Environment Build and Deploy
When software is deployed to any system, there is a natural tendency for disruption
. If new code is being deployed to an application server that server often requires a restart so that new code can be loaded. If a web server such as Apache or Nginx is being reconfigured this often requires a fast restart measured in seconds.

Some of these build and deploy related disruptions can be avoided through the use of load balancers and clusters of machines. On the largest projects, this is essential in both Production as well as Staging and QA systems. An example is a QA system for a large bank’s transaction processing system. There are so many teams that depend on this system to be up and running 24/7 that causing any disruption would run the risk of freezing the QA process across the entire company.

Other build and deploy downtimes are unavoidable. A frequent example is changes to a database schema. Certain changes to tables and indexes require systems to be stopped and rebooted to reach a state where database activity isn’t competing with DDL statements.

The downtime requirement for a given build and deploy to a test environment is a central measure that is directly related to the availability metrics mentioned before in this section.

How to Measure Build/Deploy Downtime
It’s simple: run a build and deployment and keep track of the downtime that falls into the timespan of each build and deploy function. If you have a continuous integration system such as Jenkins or Bamboo, grab the timestamps of the last few builds and look at your monitoring metrics on QA and Staging to see if there is a system impact.

Example Metric: Goal for Build/Deploy Downtime
Your goal for this metric depends on your level of availability
. If you are working on a shared service, your build and deploy downtime requirement should be as close to zero as possible. If you are working on a less critical application, then your build and deploy downtime should be measured in minutes or seconds.

How does this Metric Motivate Concrete Action?
This metric encourages your Release Engineers and Test Environment Managers to drive build and deploy downtime to zero. With the tools available to developers and DevOps professionals it is possible to achieve zero-downtime deployments to QA and Staging systems. Doing this will give your internal customers more confidence in the systems you are delivering.

The post Metrics and KPIs for Test Environment Stability appeared first on Plutora.

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